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ENF 3 Sources: Locating, Citing & Giving Credit: Start Here

This guide covers: 1. Locating good sources 2. Citing sources 3. Plagiarism

Locating College Level Resources

The best place to look for college level resources is your library homepage:  Library.Reynolds.edu

It is important to think critically about the resources you find online as well as in print to determine if a resource is credible. The checklist below will help you identify resources to use for college research assignments:

ABCD’s of Evaluating Resources:  

  1. Author/Authority
  2. Bias
  3. Content/Currency
  4. Design

Locating the Good Sources

North Carolina State University Libraries. This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States license - http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/evaluating-sources/

Why should I cite my sources?

The primary reason to cite your sources is to avoid plagiarism and give proper credit to the original author or creator.  Other reasons for citing your sources:

  • Enables a reader to locate the sources you cited.
  • Demonstrates the accuracy and reliability of your information.
  • Shows the amount of research you’ve done.
  • Strengthens your work by lending outside support to your ideas.

Created by North Carolina State University Libraries

What is Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is using another person’s ideas or words without clearly acknowledging or citing the source of that information. You must give credit whenever you use:

  • Another person's idea, opinion, or theory.
  • Direct quotes from another person's actual spoken or written words.
  • Paraphrasing of another person's spoken or written words.
  • Any piece of information this is not common knowledge (e.g., fact, figure, statistic, chart)
  • Multimedia created by another person (e.g., photo, drawing, film clip, music, etc.)

How to avoid plagiarism in 5 easy steps